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Lot 79 – Bob Ringwood Printed Production Costume Designs for Batman (Michael Keaton) and the Joker (Jack Nicholson), Batman (1989)

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Lot 79 – Bob Ringwood Printed Production Costume Designs for Batman (Michael Keaton) and the Joker (Jack Nicholson), Batman (1989)

One of his most memorable looks from the film features a purple wool fedora style hat; a purple tailcoat; a satin teal cravat; a teal waistcoat; an orange satin shirt; purple suede gloves and a pair of brightly coloured plaid pattern trousers

Nicholson’s own personal style was enhanced, and he even had his own input into the costumes, such as the shade of purple matching his favourite sports team, the LA Lakers.

Well, director Schumacher felt the suit needed to convey more sex appeal and had studied statues of Greek Gods for inspiration for his batsuit design

In Tim Burton’s 1992 Batman, the main difference in design for this Batsuit is that is that it exhibited a sleeker and more armoured look than in 1989 design. The torso section in particular featured art deco plating style sections rather than the more muscular form. According to Bob Ringwood, images of art deco appliances and industrial vehicles were used as inspiration and their aerodynamic designs were translated into the design of the suit. Learning from the previous production, the foam rubber material used to construct this costume was slightly thinner and flexible, allowing the actor more movement. The design of the chest emblem was also tweaked so it resembled the design originally seen in the comics and the cowl now displayed a smooth finish as opposed to the bat-skin texture seen in the 1989 iteration.

In order to make the movies more family friendly, Warner Bros. decided the movie franchise needed some major changes, including dropping Burton. So, in early 1994 director Joel Schumacher was bought on board to produce a more light-hearted approach to Gotham’s caped crusader. The gloomy, sinister settings that epitomised the look of Burton’s 1989 and 1992 versions were replaced with elements of neon, producing a drastic contrast in look and feel. Continue reading »

written by martin